Chemistry @ Colgate

Course Offerings in Chemistry


101,102 General Chemistry (I, II)
111 Chemical Principles
263, 264 Organic Chemistry
333 Physical Chemistry I
334 Physical Chemistry II
353 Proteins and Nucleic Acids
356 Metabolism and Bioenergetics
371 Instrumental Methods
383 Fundamentals of Neurochemistry/Neuropharmacology
404 Advanced Physical Chemistry
411 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
462 Advanced Organic Chemistry
482 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory
291, 391, 491 Independent Studies

 
101, 102 General Chemistry (I, II)
Staff

A two-term sequence that introduces chemical principles which apply to all areas of chemistry. The first term (CHEM 101) deals with stoichiometry, gases, the electronic structure of atoms, the periodic table, chemical bonding and molecular geometry, and transition metal and coordination chemistry. The second term (CHEM 102) covers intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, nuclear chemistry, equilibria, acids and bases (emphasizing equilibrium studies), thermodynamics, electrochemistry and the descriptive chemistry of the more common elements. Both courses require one laboratory session per week. CHEM 101 is offered in the fall; CHEM 102 in the spring. Successful completion of CHEM 101 is a prerequisite for CHEM 102.

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111 Chemical Principles
Q. Shen

CHEM 111 is a one-term course designed for the well-prepared student. It covers the fundamentals of chemistry, including introductions to bonding theories, thermodynamics, aqueous equilibria (including acid-base and redox-equilibria), coordination chemistry and kinetics. Laboratory work is designed to reinforce ideas discussed in the lectures. The chemistry department offers a non-credit examination that is used to evaluate whether CHEM 111 or 101-102 is the appropriate introductory chemistry program for a given student. CHEM 111 (or CHEM 101-102) serves as a prerequisite for CHEM 263-264 (Organic Chemistry) or the CHEM 333-334 (Physical Chemistry) sequences. Prerequisites: secondary school chemistry and two to three years of secondary school mathematics. Open to first-year students (and to second-year students by permission of instructor). Offered in the fall only.

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263, 264 Organic Chemistry (I, II)
J. Cochran, P. Jue, E. Nolen

A study of the properties and reactions of typical organic compounds of the aliphatic, aromatic and heterocyclic series. Structural theory, as it applies to covalent substances and mechanisms of the reactions of organic compounds, is emphasized. When possible, illustrations are chosen from materials of biological interest. The laboratory affords experience in the synthesis, purification and characterization of representative organic compounds, and involves the use of modern chemical instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or the equivalent. Successful completion of CHEM 263 is a prerequisite for CHEM 264. CHEM 263 is offered in the fall; CHEM 264 in the spring.

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333 Physical Chemistry I
Q. Shen

Fundamentals of physical chemistry, particularly those most commonly applied in related fields such as organic, biological and geological chemistry: classical thermodynamics of ideal and real systems, electrochemistry and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 102 or 111, MATH 112 and PHYS 112 or 121, or permission of instructor. Offered in the fall only.

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334 Physical Chemistry II
Q. Shen, E. Woods

Introduction to quantum mechanics, fundamentals of chemical bonding, spectroscopy and methods of molecular structure determination, and miscellaneous topics. Laboratory experiments emphasize the use of modern instrumental methods to examine atomic and molecular properties. Four class periods plus two afternoons (Monday/Wednesday or Tuesday/Thursday) per week. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of CHEM 371 and 333, or permission of instructor. Offered in the spring only.

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353 Proteins and Nucleic Acids
R. Rowlett, G. Gogel

This course offer a survey of the biological polymers, focusing on the molecular building blocks of proteins and the functions of proteins as structural materials and catalysts; the structure, function and chemistry of the nucleic acids and their role in information storage; and the physical and chemical methods of biopolymer research. Prerequisite: CHEM 264. Offered in the fall only.

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356 Metabolism and Bioenergetics
G. Gogel, R. Rowlett

This course surveys the chemistry and regulation of the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides. The energetics and control strategies for metabolic processes are emphasized. Specific topics include: the breakdown of food molecules to produce usable chemical energy, photosynthesis, and the biosynthesis of building blocks for protein and nucleic acid synthesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 264. Offered in the spring only.

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371 Instrumental Methods
S. Brazill

An introduction to the theory, practice and applications of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis. The theoretical background and principles of operation of modern chemical research instrumentation are examined. Laboratory experiments emphasize care, calibration, operation and application of these instruments. The course meets three class periods plus two afternoons (Monday/Wednesday or Tuesday/Thursday) per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 102 or 111; and CHEM 264, or permission of instructor. Offered in the fall only.

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383 Fundamentals of Neurochemistry/Neuropharmacology
J. Yoshino

The chemistry and pharmacology of the nervous system are examined in depth using current journal articles. Biochemical approaches discussed in the examination of the nervous system include: subcellular fractionation, biochemical markers, polypeptide and lipid separation and identification, and uses of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: the 02A bipotential glial progenitor cell, mechanisms of myelination, demyelinating diseases, calcium dependent and independent mechanisms in synaptic transmission, second messenger systems and biochemical bases of neural disease. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: PSYC 170, BIOL 302, and CHEM 263, or permission of instructor. This course is also listed as NEUR 383 and PSYC 383.

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404 Advanced Physical Chemistry
Q. Shen, E. Woods

This course addresses advanced topics in physical chemistry, including spectroscopy, an introduction to group theory and its applications to symmetry properties of molecules (structures, bonding, spectra), and statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: CHEM 334. Offered in the spring only.

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411 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
P. Sheridan

After reviewing general principles of atomic structure, molecular symmetry, chemical bonding, and acid-base and electron-transfer reactions, the course emphasis shifts to the chemistry of transition metal complexes. The bonding, structural patterns and reaction mechanisms of classical coordination complexes and organometallic compounds are studied. Special topics, such as bioinorganic chemistry or transition metal photochemistry are covered as time permits. Prerequisites: CHEM 334, or the equivalent. Offered in the fall only.

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462 Advanced Organic Chemistry
E. Nolen, G. Geier

A detailed study of the mechanism of reactions of certain organic compounds. The techniques for determining mechanisms (e.g., spectroscopy, kinetics) are emphasized. Each student establishes a firm foundation in organic molecular structure, surveys reaction mechanisms, and develops a repertoire of organic reactions. Particular attention is given to recent developments in enantio selective synthesis. The interface of biological and organic chemistry is also studied. Prerequisites: CHEM 264, 333 (334 can be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor. Offered in the spring only.

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482 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory
Staff

One or more projects designed by students in collaboration with faculty members, provide a variety of laboratory experiences. The purpose is to build on and consolidate the students previous experiences in literature searching, project design, use of modern instrumentation for data acquisition and analysis, problem solution, and oral and written communication of results. Eight hours of laboratory work per week are required, during each of two terms. Each student will give an oral presentation of his or her project at the weekly chemistry department seminar and submit written end-of-term reports. In the spring term, a student who is a candidate for a degree with honors will submit a thesis in lieu of a written report. Prerequisites: CHEM 264, 371. Pre- or co-requisites: CHEM 333, 334.

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291, 391, 491 Independent Studies
Staff

Independent Studies is designed for students who wish to pursue problems or studies not adequately covered by formal course work. Prerequisite: permission of the chemistry department.

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