Honors

Candidates for honors in history must:

1.  Have or exceed, by the time of graduation, a concentration GPA of 3.5 and an overall GPA of 3.0.

2.  Complete an honors thesis which has been judged by the major adviser and one other department faculty member to be of A or A- quality. The thesis is normally expected to be completed in two terms. It may be started in any 400-level history seminar, any history 300- or 400-level independent, or the London History Study Group; papers may also be developed from the term paper in any 300-level history course. A candidate is encouraged to enroll subsequently in HIST 490 to complete the thesis.

 

High Honors

Candidates for high honors in history must:

1.  Have or exceed by the time of graduation, a concentration GPA of 3.75 and an overall GPA of 3.0.

2.  Complete an honors thesis which has been judged by the major adviser and by one other department faculty member to be of A quality.

3.  Defend the paper in an oral examination before the two faculty readers. The examination must also be judged to be of excellent quality.

 

Awards

The Department Award for Excellence - to the Senior with the best overall performance in the History Concentration.

The 2002-2003 award winner was Leah Haught

The Douglas K. Reading History Prize - to an outstanding junior or senior who is majoring in history with preference to Modern European History, Russian History or Ancient or Medieval History. This prize is given in honor of Professor Douglas K. "Doc" Reading, a legendary professor in the history department from 1938-1980.

The 2002-2003 winners was split between Danielle Battisti and Shwan Lingley.

The Scott Saunders Prize - to the best honors thesis written by a participant of the London History Study Group. Named in honor of Scott Saunders, class of 1989, who was on Pan Am flight 103 that went down over Lockerbie, Scotland, victim of a terrorist's bomb on December, 21st, 1988.

The 2002-2003 winner was Melanie Kiechle.

The History Honors Award - to the best honors thesis written by a student who did not participate in the London History Study Group.

The 2002-2003 winner was Brenda Burchill.
 

 

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