Romance Languages & Literatures    at Colgate

   Program of Study

Curricular Information
General Info
Concentration
Minor Concentration
Honors
Advanced Placement
Language Placement


Course Offerings
French
Italian
Spanish

Placement Guidelines
French
Italian
Spanish
Exceptions



Colgate University | Romance Language Homepage


 

General Information

The aims of this department are to develop in the student an ability to understand, speak, read, and write a second language effectively and to provide the student with a solid foundation in the literature and culture of France, Spain, and Latin America. Many of the courses offered in the department may be taken by students who do not plan to concentrate in French or Spanish but who would like to maintain or develop their knowledge of these languages and cultures. Given the multi-cultural nature of the United States today, familiarity with a second language and culture will enhance a student’s preparation for a career in any profession. Advanced study of Spanish or French (300-level and higher) makes the student eligible for the intimate contact with a foreign culture available through the department’s study groups abroad. A concentration in French or Spanish prepares a student for advanced study in the field of literature and can be particularly useful in the fields of law, business, international trade, journalism, education, and public administration.

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Concentration Program

The department offers major and minor concentrations in both French and Spanish, but not in Italian. Courses counting toward these concentrations are conducted entirely in the appropriate language. The following regulations apply to major and minor concentrations in both languages:

1. With some restrictions, only 300- and 400-level courses in language and literature may be counted. Depending on the courses taken, a student may need more than the minimum number of courses required to complete a concentration.
2. In order to receive 400-level credit, courses must be taken either at Colgate or on the department-sponsored study groups in Dijon or Madrid.
FREN 301 and SPAN 361 or 362 may be taken for concentration credit on campus only. An exception is made for students who have received credit for these courses by scoring 4 or 5 (French) or 5 (Spanish) on the AP language exam.
3. No more than two AP or transfer credits, or combination of the two, may be counted.
4. A student who has completed a 400-level course may not take a 350-level survey course.
5. No departmental course with a grade of less than C– is credited toward a concentration. For graduation the minimum GPA required in courses counting toward a concentration is 2.0 (C); all departmental courses taken in the concentration are used to calculate this average.
6.No more than two departmental courses counting toward a concentration may be taken in any one term. Exceptions to this rule can be made only under very unusual circumstances and with the approval of the department chair.

Concentration Program in French or Spanish:

A concentration in French or Spanish is a program of study of French or Hispanic language and literature. It consists of a minimum of eight courses at the 300 and 400 levels. It must include FREN 301, or SPAN 361 or 362, and five 400-level literature courses. Students concentrating in French must take two courses at the 350 level before enrolling in a 400-level literature course. Exceptions to this rule can be made only with the approval of the department chair. The 400-level courses are divided into the following course categories:

French: (1) 460, 472, 474; (2) 452, 462, 463, 464; (3) 453, 465, 466, 469; (4) 451, 454, 468;
Spanish: (1) 460, 461, 462, 465, 466, 467; (2) 471, 472, 473, 474, 475, 477, 478, 479.

French concentrators must take at least one course in each of categories 1 and 2, and at least one course in either category 3 or 4. Spanish concentrators must take at least two courses from category 1.
Independent study courses are permitted only when the above distribution requirements are met.
FREN or SPAN 490 is open only to candidates who are studying independently for honors.
Concentrators who qualify are expected to participate in the France or Spain Study Group.

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Minor Concentration Program

Minor Concentration Program in French or Spanish A minor concentration in French or Spanish consists of a minimum of six courses at the 300 and 400 levels. In French this must include FREN 301, two courses at the 350 level (taken before enrolling in a 400-level literature course), and a minimum of three 400-level literature courses, one each from categories 1 and 2, and one from either category 3 or 4. The Spanish minor concentration must include SPAN 361 or 362, and at least three 400-level literature courses, including at least one course from category 1. No independent study courses may be credited toward the minor concentration.

Students with minor concentrations in French or Spanish are strongly encouraged to apply for the France or Spain Study Group.

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Honors

Departmental honors require a GPA of 3.0 and an average in all concentration courses of 3.3. After selecting a topic and adviser, the student registers for FREN or SPAN 490 during one of the semesters of the senior year and writes a paper of significant length and depth. The quality of the paper determines whether the student receives honors (A– or higher required) or merely a grade.

Departmental high honors requires a GPA of 3.0 and an average in all concentration courses of 3.7. After selecting a topic and adviser, the student registers for FREN or SPAN 491 in the seventh term in order to compile a bibliography, gather materials, and begin the preparation of a thesis. The student then registers for FREN or SPAN 490 in the eighth term in order to complete the thesis. The final version serves as the basis for an oral examination by three or more members of the faculty. The quality of the thesis and of the oral defense determines whether the student receives high honors (A or higher), honors (A–), or merely a grade.

A 490-course registration must be in addition to the minimum concentration requirement. The expected length of an honors paper or high honors thesis is established by the adviser in consultation with the department chair.

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Advanced Placement

University credit is automatically granted to entering students who achieve a score of 4 or higher on AP examinations in language or literature in French and Spanish. Concentration credit is granted for a score of 5.

The following course equivalents are established: In French, language grade of 4 = 202; language grade of 5 = 301; literature grade of 4 = 202; literature grade of 5 = 399. In Spanish, language grade of 4 = 202; language grade of 5 = 361 or 362; literature grade of 4 = 202; literature grade of 5 = 399.

Students with an AP language grade of 3 may take FREN 202 or SPAN 202 or higher. Students with an AP language or literature grade of 4 or higher must register at the 300 level if they continue their study of French or Spanish.

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Language Placement

Students wishing to continue a Romance language studied in secondary school should register for the appropriate courses indicated by the prerequisites in the course descriptions listed below. Credit will not be granted to a student taking a course at a lower level than a course for which the prerequisites have been completed. Written permission from the department chair is required for an exception to this regulation. In all matters of language placement, the department makes the final determination.

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Course Offerings

French

100 Level
101-102 Elementary French

200 Level
200 French Elective Abroad
201 Intermediate French
202 Intermediate French: Language and Literature
222 French Literature in Translation


300 Level
301 Advanced Grammar and Composition
351, 352, 353 French Literature Surveys:
351 Introduction to the Study of French Literature I: the Early and Classical Eras
352 Introduction to the Study of French Literature II: the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
353 Introduction to the Study of French Literature II: the Twentieth Century
399 Readings in French Literature

400 Level
401 Stylistics
440 Contemporary French Civilization
451 The Baroque, Classic and Romantic Theater in France
452 Readings in French Poetry I
453 Readings in French Poetry II
460 Literature of the Renaissance
462 The Age of Enlightenment
463 The French Novel in the Romantic Period
464 The Realist and Naturalist Novel
465 Twentieth-Century French Literature I
466 Twentieth-Century French Literature II
467 France under the Occupation
468 Literature of Adventure and Quest
469 Contemporary French Literature
472 Molière and La Fontaine
474 The Court of Louis XIV
480 Major French Authors
490 Honors

200, 300, 400 Courses Taken Abroad
291, 391, 491 Independent Studies

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101-102 Elementary French
E. Denaro

This course is designed to introduce students to basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing the French language, as well as to introduce various aspects of Francophone culture. Audiocassettes, videos, and a CD-ROM are integral parts of this course. These courses must be taken in successive terms in the same academic year. Degree credit is awarded only if the second-term course is successfully completed.

FREN 101 is primarily for students with no previous study of French. Exceptions are made for students with less than two years of secondary-school French or students with two years of secondary-school French who must meet the language requirement. This course is offered in the fall only.

FREN 102, while primarily intended for students continuing from 101, may also be taken as a refresher conversation course by students who studied French in secondary school some time ago: two years of study ending at least one-half year before, three years of study ending at least one and one-half years before, or four years of study ending at least two and one-half years before. This course is offered in the spring only.

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200 French Elective Abroad
J. Naughton

This course number is used for certain electives taken in the French Study Program at the University of Burgundy.

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201 Intermediate French
E. Denaro

This course is designed to improve students’ ability to understand, speak, read, and write French. Class time is devoted to communication activities, to a study of intermediate grammar, conversational vocabulary, and Francophone culture. This course includes an audiocassette and video program. Prerequisite: two or three years of secondary-school French, or a one-year college elementary French course. This course is not open to students who score 3 or higher on a French AP exam. It may be taken as a refresher course by students who studied French in secondary school some time ago, as follows: three years of study ending at least one-half year before, four years of study ending at least one and one-half years before, or more than four years of study ending at least two and one-half years before.

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202 Intermediate French: Language and Literature
P. Riley

Designed to increase the student’s ability to understand, speak, read, and write French, this course emphasizes development of reading comprehension. A review of the more difficult points of intermediate grammar is included. A major focus is the acquisition of skills necessary for the study of literature. This course includes vocabulary study, conversational practice, and short compositions based on readings. Prerequisite: three to four years of secondary-school French, or FREN 201, or the equivalent. Not open to students who have received credit for 202 by scoring 3 on the AP literature exam.

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222 French Literature in Translation
Staff

This course analyzes some outstanding works of French literature that are available in translation. Works are chosen from various periods and are considered within their historical and cultural context. Taught in English.

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223 Introduction to French Cinema
Staff

This course introduces students to major trends and issues in French cinema, while giving them the necessary tools to perform critical analysis of French films and a wider exposure to French and Francophone culture and history. Students are required to attend weekly screenings in addition to regular class meetings. Taught in English.

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301 Advanced Grammar and Composition
J. Gallucci

This course is structured as a review of grammatical principles with emphasis on correctness in expository composition in French. Assignments include frequent essays as well as translation exercises. Prerequisite: at least one 350-level course. Not open to students who score 4 or 5 on the AP language exam, except by special permission of instructor. Students required to take this course may do so only on campus.

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351, 352, 353 Introduction to the Study of Literature in French
H. Julien; B. Lintz; P. Riley

These three courses form an introduction to the reading and study of French literature. Focusing on three crucial eras of literary development, students learn the techniques of close reading and literary analysis, as well as explore the general cultural contexts in which the literary work was created. The focus of each course may vary, but the reading consists of plays, poetry, and prose. The courses may be taken in any order. Prerequisite: four years of high school French or the equivalent. Students who have taken a 400-level literature seminar may not register for these introductory courses.

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351 Introduction to the Study of French Literature I: the Early and Classical Eras
P. Riley

As an introduction, through reading and discussion, to three diverse and formative periods of French literature, this course shows the inspiration and variety of expression that mark each period. Readings include selections from La Chanson de Roland, courtly romance, the fabliaux (all medieval writings to be read in modern French versions); prose and poetry of Renaissance France; tragic and comic writers of the French Classical theater. Prerequisite: at least four years of secondary-school French or FREN 202.

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352 Introduction to the Study of French Literature II: the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
B. Lintz

This course studies major works, principal authors, and literary movements of French literature in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Prerequisite: at least four years of secondary-school French or FREN 202.

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353 Introduction to the Study of French Literature II: the Twentieth Century
H. Julien

This course offers a close reading of some representative works of the twentieth century. Selections are chosen from the shorter fiction and essays of outstanding French writers and include such authors as: Apollinaire, Gide, Ionesco, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, and Duras. Prerequisite: at least four years of secondary-school French or FREN 202.

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399 Readings in French Literature
This represents the number and title given for AP literature scores of 4 or 5.

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401 Stylistics
Staff

A study of cultural expression through the writing of formal compositions and the analysis and translation of texts. The course is designed to give advanced students a finer feeling for French style, an awareness of shades of meaning, and a mastery of certain difficulties not discussed in lower-level language courses. Enrollment is limited to students participating in the France Study Group (Dijon).

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440 Contemporary French Civilization
Staff

This course examines, by means of lecture and discussion, the impact of geography, demography, history, politics, economics, patterns of behavior, and the French cultural heritage on contemporary France. Enrollment is limited to students participating in the France Study Group (Dijon).

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451 The Baroque, Classic, and Romantic Theater in France
B. Lintz

This seminar traces the evolution of French theater through a detailed analysis of major dramatic forms and currents prevalent in France from the Middle Ages to the late nineteenth century. The course examines French theater both in light of the dramatic doctrines formulated at various times in its history by theoreticians and dramatists and in relation to the main intellectual and philosophical currents that influenced dramatic vision and practice. Authors studied generally include Adam de la Halle, Rotrou, Corneille, Racine, Molière, Marivaux, Beaumarchais, Hugo, Musset, Vigny, and Rostand.

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452 Readings in French Poetry I
J. Naughton

This course focuses on some of the major poets of the nineteenth century, by studying their work in the context of the larger political, social, and historical events of the time. Readings concentrate on representative texts of the following poets: Lamartine, Alfred de Vigny, Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, Hugo, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, and others.

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453 Readings in French Poetry II
J. Naughton

This course analyzes some major poets of the twentieth century in the context of larger artistic, political, and social movements. Readings focus on representative texts of the following poets: Apollinaire, Claudel, Valéry, Breton, Jouve, Emmanuel, Bonnefoy, Ponge, Jaccottet, and others.

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454 Twentieth-Century French Autobiography
H. Julien

This seminar examines the development and specificities of twentieth-century autobiographical texts. While the main focus is on the texts themselves, some related theoretical problems are also considered, such as the conditions and possibility of writing the Self; autobiography’s link to other types of personal writings; its relationship to fiction; and its role in our modern definition of “Man.” This genre being rooted in questions of the emergence of the Self, particular attention is given to women and francophone writers, who were traditionally regarded as “the Other.” Authors read may include Proust, Gide, Sartre, Beauvoir, Sarraute, Leiris, Yourcenar, Bigras, and Laye.

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456 The Eighteenth-Century Epistolary Novel in France
P. Riley

This course examines some of the French eighteenth century’s most celebrated “letter novels.” Through readings of Montesquieu, Graffigny, Rousseau, and Laclos, the course focuses on the formal and thematic development of the epistolary genre over a period of some sixty years. The novels are read against a historical background stretching from the reign of Louis XIV through the French Revolution.

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458 Libertine Fiction of the French Eighteenth Century
P. Riley

Beginning in the seventeenth century under the label libertinage érudite, libertine fiction evolves into a major genre in the Enlightenment. The course follows its development through readings of Prèvost, Crébillon fils, Diderot, Denon, and Sade, and explores the following questions: How do philosophy, fiction, and sexual politics coalesce in libertine literature? How can one reconcile libertinage – a way of living and writing frequently reduced to passion and sensuality – with the broader currents of the most “rational” century in French literary history? An exploration of libertine literature thus entails a focus on cultural history, and serves as a point of departure for a broader reflection on the Enlightenment.

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460 Literature of the Renaissance
J. Gallucci

A detailed study of the lyric poetry of Louise Labé, Pierre Ronsard, Joachim du Bellay, and Clément Marot. The course explores how each writer seeks to create his or her own unique poetic style within the context of the intense literary creation and experimentation that characterize Renaissance France. Special attention is given to the themes of love and Classical mythology as sources of poetic inspiration. Some attention to Renaissance painting, to the lyric poetry of François Villon, and to selected prose of Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, and Rabelais is given in order to illustrate the enormous and varied impact of Humanism and the Italian Renaissance.

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462 The Age of Enlightenment
P. Riley

This course examines some of the relationships between Enlightenment thought and the dominant forms of written expression in the French eighteenth century. Through readings, students consider a number of the Enlightenment’s most pressing concerns, such as moral and political philosophy, religious and civil tolerance, natural law, and the role of literature and the arts in society, among others. Authors read include Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, Beaumarchais, and Sade.

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463 The French Novel in the Romantic Period
B. Lintz

This seminar explores the development of the novel in the first half of the nineteenth century. The course begins by examining the historical, social, and literary circumstances that prevailed in post-revolutionary France and that influenced writers and their efforts to renew the novel. Through close analysis of texts by such authors as Chateaubriand, Constant, Musset, Sand, Hugo, Stendhal, and Balzac, the course traces the extent to which Romanticism, the dominant literary movement of the time, informed literary innovations and accounted both for the popularity of certain narrative genres and for the visions and concerns expressed in these works.

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464 The Realist and Naturalist Novel
B. Lintz

The focus of this seminar is on the evolution of the novel in the second half of the nineteenth century. Influenced by the philosophical current of positivism and reacting against Romanticism, novelists aimed at the objective representation of contemporary reality. Works by such authors as Dumas fils, Flaubert, Maupassant, Daudet, and Zola are studied in the context of the literary movements of Realism and Naturalism. The texts usually selected for discussion are centered on the representation of women. Through critical textual analysis the course examines the relationship between the theoretical positions espoused by proponents of Realism and Naturalism and their literary practice.

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465 Twentieth-Century French Literature I
H. Julien

This seminar examines some of the most important novels and plays of the first half of the twentieth century, until World War II. Authors read generally include Gide, Proust, Breton, Malraux, Giraudoux; the following questions are discussed: How did these writers see their role in the rapidly changing social and political climate of the period? How did they transform the two dominant literary modes of the end of the nineteenth century (Naturalism and Symbolism) to express more modern concerns? How are we to understand the emergence of an introspective hero who so often searches for his or her identity on the margins of society?

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466 Twentieth-Century French Literature II
H. Julien

The concerns of this seminar are similar to those of FREN 465. The works read, however, are from World War II to the present. Authors usually include Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Duras, Modiano, Le Clézio.

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468 Literature of Adventure and Quest
J. Naughton

This course studies the evolution and transmutation of conventions of quest literature from the Middle Ages to the present day. The course examines the significance of the changes within the genre as reflections of the cultures from which they emerge. Readings range from the romances of Chrétien de Troyes to the contemporary French novel.

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469 Contemporary French Literature
Staff

This course is taught at the University of Burgundy and limited to France Study Group participants.

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472 Molière and La Fontaine
J. Gallucci

The course provides a detailed study of two major comic writers of French Classical literature, emphasizing especially the creation of individual comic and satirical styles within the classical tradition. The course examines both specific themes such as the images of king, court, and society, and also more general literary and cultural questions. These include the nature of comedy, the relationship between popular culture and literary art, the problem of literary translation. Readings are drawn from the farces, short plays, and major works of Molière and from the Fables, the Contes et nouvelles, and selected minor poems of La Fontaine, as well as from La Fontaine’s legacy in pictorial art and folklore.

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474 The Court of Louis XIV
J. Gallucci

The theme of the court is used to explore the major works in prose and poetry of Classical France, reading these works as examples both of insightful social analysis and of outstanding achievements in literary style and art. Readings are drawn primarily from the works of Madame de Sévigné, Racine, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, Madame de Lafayette, and La Bruyère. Key topics include the relationship between writer and society in seventeenth-century France, Versailles as a theatrical setting for the Sun-King, and literature as both social commentary and divertissement. The seminar also studies the theme of the court as it is expressed in seventeenth-century painting and music.

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480, 481 Major French Authors
J. Naughton

These seminars, offered on an irregular basis, provide the opportunity for extensive study of the works of the most distinguished authors writing in the French language. They are taught by faculty members who have particular interest and expertise in the literature to be examined.

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490Honors


200, 300, 400 Courses Taken Abroad
These numbers are used only for courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, a non-Colgate study group, or in a foreign institution of higher learning. They designate either language or non-language courses for which there are no exact Colgate equivalents. Such courses carry graduation credit but are not normally counted toward a concentration unless they are taken in department-sponsored study groups.

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291, 391, 491 Independent Studies
Staff

Independent study courses are designed to fulfill individual needs in language and literature not otherwise provided in this department. SPAN 491 study in literature may not be undertaken until seminar distribution requirements are satisfied

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Course Offerings

Italian

100 Level
101-102 Elementary Italian

200 Level
201 Intermediate Italian
202 Intermediate Italian: Language and Literature
222 Italian Literature In Translation
280 Major Italian Authors: Dante

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101-102 Elementary Italian

C. Amann

This beginning course is designed to introduce the student to the basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading and writing the Italian language and includes considerable work with audio cassettes and video. These courses must be taken in successive terms in the same academic year. Written permission is required for seniors. Students with a grade of C- or below in 101 are urged to repeat the course before continuing. Degree credit only if the second-term course is successfully completed.

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201 Intermediate Italian

L. Caminati
This is a one-term language course designed to improve the student's ability to speak, read and write Italian. It includes review of some grammar and introduction of new grammar, vocabulary study, conversational practice, short compositions, cultural and literary readings, and some work with video. Prerequisite: two or three years of secondary-school Italian, or ITAL 101, or the equivalent. Students with a grade below C- in 102 are urged to repeat the course before continuing. Not open to students judged to have proficiency equivalent to an AP score of 3 or higher. Offered every fall in Venice (Italy Study Group) and at least every other year on campus.

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202 Intermediate Italian: Language and Literature


This one-term course is designed to increase the student's ability to understand, speak, read and write Italian and emphasizes development of reading comprehension. It includes review of some grammar and introduction of new grammar, vocabulary study, conversational practice and short compositions. There is considerable focus on the reading of short works of Italian literature. Prerequisite: three or four years of secondary-school Italian, or ITAL 102 with a B+ grade or higher, or ITAL 201, or the equivalent. Not open to students judged to have proficiency equivalent to an AP score of 4 or higher. Offered at least every other year.

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222 Italian Literature in Translation


This course analyzes some outstanding works of Italian literature that are available in translation. Some short selections are also read in the original. Taught only in Venice in conjunction with the Italy Study Group.

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280 Major Italian Authors: Dante


Through close reading of the Divine Comedy and the Vita Nuova, this course studies Dante's development as a political theorist, philosopher and poet as the means to understanding medieval man's perceptions of his world. Taught in English.

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Course Offerings

Spanish

100 Level
101-102 Elementary Spanish

200 Level
201 Intermediate Spanish
202 Intermediate Spanish: Language and Literature
224 Cervantes and Quixotism
225 Modern Latin-American Literature in Translation
226 Latin-American Women Writers

300 Level
352, 353, 354, 355 Spanish and Latin-American Literature Surveys
352 Spanish Literature: Love and Honour in the Golden Age
353 Spanish Literature: Modern Spain in Crisis
354 Latin-American Literature: Illusion, Fantasy, Magical Realism
355 Latin-American Literature: the Many Voices of Latin America
361 Advanced Composition and Stylistics
362 Advanced Composition and Stylistics for Native Speakers
399 Readings in Hispanic Literature

400 Level
460 The Spanish Renaissance
461 Theater of the Golden Age
462 Cervantes' Don Quijote
465 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature
466 Colonial Latin-American Literature
467 Nineteenth-Century Latin-American Literature
471 The Generation of '98
472 From the Generation of '98 to the Contemporary Period
473 Post-Civil War Spanish Novel
474 Contemporary Spanish Theater
477 Women Writing in Latin America
478 Literature of the Caribbean
479 Contemporary Latin-American Literature
480 Major Hispanic Authors
490 Honors

200, 300, 400 Courses Taken Abroad
291, 391, 491 Independent Studies

Courses Taught in Spain
370 Spanish Language and Civilization (August)
380 Advanced Grammar
400 Special Topics
402 Stylistics: Cultural Events
430-439 Literature Seminars
440-449 Seminars in the Social Sciences
451 History of Spanish Painting

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101-102 Elementary Spanish

P. Mejía-Barrera

This beginning course is designed to introduce the student to the basic skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing the Spanish language. Work in the Keck Humanities Resource Center complements class work. These courses must be taken in successive terms in the same academic year. Written permission is required for seniors. Students with a grade of C– or below in 101 or D+ or below in 102 are urged to repeat the course before continuing. Degree credit is awarded only if the second-term course is successfully completed.

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201 Intermediate Spanish
M. Bearman

This one-term language course is designed to improve the student’s ability to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish. It includes a comprehensive review of grammar, regularly scheduled vocabulary study, conversational practice, short compositions, and laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: two or three years of secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 101-102. Students with a grade of D+ or below in 102 are urged to repeat the course before continuing. Not open to students who score 3 or higher on a Spanish AP exam.

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202 Intermediate Spanish: Language and Literature
F. Luciani; N. Stolova

This one-term course is designed to improve the student’s ability to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish and emphasizes development of reading comprehension. It includes a review of the more difficult points of intermediate grammar and focuses on the acquisition of skills necessary for the study of literature. Vocabulary study, conversational practice, and short compositions based on readings are included. Recommended for students who have a good background in grammar but need further training in reading before undertaking courses at the 350 level. Prerequisite: three to four years of secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 201, or the equivalent. Not open to students who receive credit for 202 by scoring 4 on the AP language exam or 3 or 4 on the AP literature exam.

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224 Cervantes and Quixotism
Staff

His exemplary stories introduce some of the favored topics and techniques of Miguel de Cervantes. These are followed by a study of Don Quixote de la Mancha in translation. A variety of critical perspectives help guide students’ responses to this most influential masterwork of Spanish literature, called by some the first modern novel. At semester’s end, students have the opportunity to evaluate a quixotic protagonist or Cervantine procedures in a literary work of another time, another country. Taught in English.

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225 Modern Latin American Literature
in Translation
Staff

This course is a close study of major modern and contemporary Latin American authors from Borges to García Márquez. The literary works are studied in their socio-cultural contexts. Taught in English.

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226 Latin American Women Writers
L. Rojas

This course is a close study of the literature written by women in modern-contemporary Latin America. Representative authors are studied within the general framework of their socio-literary contexts. Taught in English.

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352, 353, 354, 355 Spanish and Latin American Literature Surveys

These courses may be taken in any order. Reading assignments in these 350-level courses are made on the assumption that most registrants are first-year students taking their first course at this level. These courses are for students who have both good grammar training and about a year of reading in secondary school, or who complete SPAN 202 or the equivalent. Students who complete a 400-level course may not register for these surveys.

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351 Spanish Literature: Knights and Troubadours in Medieval Spain
N. Stolova

This course offers an introduction to Spanish literature from its medieval origins through the fifteenth century, with emphasis on the relations among literature, culture, and civilization. Works from different genres are studied, including epic poetry, Hispano-Arabic poetry, folk ballads, early theater, historical works, and short stories. The course explores issues of authorship, as well as the cultural, religious, and historical contexts that produced each work. Works in Old Castilian are read in modernized Spanish. Prerequisite: at least four years of secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 202.

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352 Spanish Literature: Love and Honor in the Golden Age
 

This survey examines the interrelated notions of love, sex, and honor as they appear in the prose, theater, and poetry of Spain. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the Baroque, the so-called Golden Age of Spanish literature (sixteenth and seventeenth centuries). Readings, however, may include works from the Middle Ages and/or the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: at least four years of secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 202.

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353 Spanish Literature: Modern Spain in Crisis
A. Johnson,

Beginning with the loss of the empire in the nineteenth century and moving through a series of political upheavals, including civil war and fascism, the history of modern Spain has been one of turmoil and continual conflict. The numerous political crises both resulted from and resulted in larger crises of a social, spiritual, and moral nature. Questions of national identity, religious faith, and moral values, as they appear in Spanish literature from the late nineteenth century to the present day, are the focus of this course. Readings include works of prose, theater, and poetry drawn from a range of literary movements, and emphasis is placed on the socio-historical context and its relationship to literary innovation. Prerequisite: at least four years of secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 202.

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354 Latin American Literature: Illusion, Fantasy, Magical Realism
F. Luciani

Through a survey of Latin American literature from its pre-Columbian origins through the twentieth century, this course examines the many forms of alternative reality that Latin American writers have created and explored. The course relates those realities to the cultural and sociological history of Latin America as well as to larger Western literary modes, such as the Baroque, Romanticism, and Surrealism. Prerequisite: at least four years of secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 202.

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355 Latin American Literature: The Many Voices of Latin America
L. Rojas

The course explores the diversity of literary voices in Latin America, from pre-Columbian texts to the contemporary writings of Castellanos, Rulfo, and García Márquez. This survey introduces students to the most important developments in Latin American literary history as it examines questions of cultural, ethnic, gender, and class identities. Prerequisite: at least four years of secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 202.

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361 Advanced Composition and Stylistics
A. Enrique, F. Plata

This course is structured as an intensive composition class. Emphasis is placed on mastering the fine points of Spanish grammar in order to improve writing skills. In addition to regular class meetings, students are required to attend a series of cultural events, which may include film, theater, etc. Prerequisites: at least four years of secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 202. Not open to students who score 5 on the AP language exam or who complete SPAN 362 (or the former 301 or 303), except by special permission of the instructor. Students required to take this course may do so only on campus.

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362 Advanced Composition and Stylistics for Native Speakers
A. Enrique, L. Rojas

This course has the same goal as SPAN 361: correctness in expository composition. Whereas SPAN 361 addresses the problems of students learning Spanish as a second language through course-related activities, this course is designed for English-dominant bilinguals who learned Spanish mainly through extensive exposure to the spoken language in a non-classroom setting and who, though fluent orally, had insufficient opportunity to develop native-level writing skills. Prerequisites: four years secondary-school Spanish, or SPAN 202, and permission of the instructor. Not open to students with the score of 5 on the AP Spanish language exam, except by special permission of instructor, or to students who complete SPAN 361 (or the former 301 or 303). May be taken for concentration credit only on campus.

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399 Readings in Hispanic Literature
This is the number and title given for the AP literature score of 5.

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460 The Spanish Renaissance
F. Plata

This seminar studies the poetry of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Particular attention is paid to three currents: the Petrarchan tradition of love poetry, Neostoic moral poetry, and the Burlesque. Emphasis is placed on the works of Garcilaso, Fray Luis de León, Góngora, Lope de Vega, and Quevedo.

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461 Theater of the Golden Age
F. Plata

This seminar studies the techniques and themes of the comedia as exemplified primarily in the works of Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca, and Tirso de Molina.

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462 Cervantes’ Don Quijote
F. Plata

This seminar is an undergraduate introduction to Cervantes’ masterpiece, based on an analytical study supported by critical bibliography.

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465 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature
M. Rugg

This course first explores the historical and literary circumstances surrounding the rise of realism in nineteenth-century Spain, paying particular attention to aspects of the tradition that are peculiar to the Spanish tradition. Representative works from the height of Spanish realism are examined, and the course ends with the study of texts from the last decades of the century that sought to transcend the limitations inherent in the realist movement.

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466 Colonial Latin American Literature
F. Luciani

This course studies selections from the major genres of the colonial period through the end of the seventeenth century: the chronicles of the Discovery and Conquest, lyric and epic poetry, and colonial theater. The course pays particular attention to the diverse literary representations of the encounter between Spanish and indigenous cultures, and to the writings of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.

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467 Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature
F. Luciani

This course examines literary works in prose and verse through about 1870, with an emphasis on the varied manifestations of Romanticism in Latin America. These works are studied in the context of the continent’s struggle for political and cultural independence and the project of nation-building.

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471 The Generation of ’98
M. Rugg

This course offers a critical assessment of the Generation of ’98 through an in-depth reading and discussion of selected texts (fictional, poetic, dramatic, philosophical, etc.) by such authors as Unamuno, Ganivet, Baroja, Valle-Inclán, Azorín, Machado, etc.

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472 From the Generation of ’98 to the Contemporary Period
M. Rugg

From the turn of the century until the Civil War, Spanish literature enjoyed an artistic explosion the likes of which had not been seen since the Golden Age. A profusion of literary movements — including the Generation of ’98, modernism, and the avant-garde — reflected the creative vibrancy of the nation even as it slipped into political and social chaos. This course analyzes the novels of this period, both in terms of literary innovation and relationship to ideological trends and social reality in early twentieth-century Spain.

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473 Post-Civil War Spanish Novel
A. Johnson

In post-Civil War Spain, the prolonged tenure of Franco and strict censorship seriously crippled the process of cultural regeneration. For literature, the repression was particularly severe, forcing most promising writers into political exile. Those who remained, however, cloaked their literary discourse on war, repression, and other themes, in an array of new narrative forms and languages. This course analyzes the most significant works of this period, both in terms of their literary innovativeness and their relationship to the sociocultural context.

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474 Contemporary Spanish Theater
A. Johnson

Through close study of representative dramatists and their respective artistic visions, this course acquaints the student with major formal and thematic developments in contemporary peninsular Spanish theater. Dramatic texts of the pre- and post-war periods are studied within the general framework of their sociocultural context.

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475 Spanish as a Global Language
A. Enrique

This course explores the historical, social, and cultural elements represented in the dialectical diversity of the Spanish language. Some of the issues studied are the development of Spanish as the national language of Spain; the contemporary status of regional languages and dialects within Spain; the spread of Spanish in the Americas, Africa, and Asia through conquest and colonization; language policies toward indigenous languages in Latin America; and the future of the role of Spanish as a minority language in the United States. Emphasis is put on the role of language in cultural and social identity as well as in political power and conflict. Taught in Spanish.

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477 Women Writing in Latin America
L. Rojas

An in-depth study of the relationship between gender and genre in literary texts written by women in contemporary Latin America and the Hispanic Caribbean, the course addresses questions of authorship within the development of Latin American women’s literary traditions, as well as the relationship between patriarchal societies and women’s literary discourses.

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478 Literature of the Caribbean
L. Rojas

This course is a close study of the Hispanic literature of the island nations of the Caribbean, with particular attention to ethnic and cultural diversity. Representative authors in the various genres are studied within the general framework of their social and literary contexts. Emphasis is placed on contemporary writers.

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479 Contemporary Latin American Literature
L. Rojas

This course offers critical study of selected contemporary Latin American texts in the light of current modes of writing and interpretation. The course delineates the major patterns of formal and thematic development within the literary history of Latin American letters, but emphasizes the analysis of structural and linguistic problems posed by the texts.

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480 Major Hispanic Authors
Staff

This seminar, offered on an irregular basis, provides the opportunity for extensive study of the works of the most distinguished authors writing in the Spanish language. It is taught by a staff member who has particular interest and expertise in the literature to be examined.

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490 Honors
Staff

200, 300, 400 Courses Taken Abroad

These numbers are used only for courses taken abroad with a Colgate study group, a non-Colgate study group, or in a foreign institution of higher learning. They designate either language or non-language courses for which there are no exact Colgate equivalents. Such courses carry graduation credit but are not normally counted toward a concentration unless they are taken in departmentally sponsored study groups.

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291, 391, 491 Independent Studies
Staff

Independent study courses are designed to fulfill individual needs in language and literature not otherwise provided in this department. SPAN 491 study in literature may not be undertaken until seminar distribution requirements are satisfied.

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Courses Taught in Spain

The following courses are normally taught in conjunction with the Spain Study Group. Only courses in language and literature count toward a Spanish concentration or minor. Students should consult with departmental advisers on credit questions.

370 Spanish Language and Civilization (August)
This course, taught in Santiago do Compostela, prepares students for their studies in Madrid. It includes grammar, literature, history, and contemporary issues in politics and society. This course carries graduation credit, but does not count toward a Spanish concentration.

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380 Advanced Grammar
This intensive language review includes grammar, conversation, composition, and weekly oral and written exercises.

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400 Special Topics
Upon approval by the director, students may elect a course sponsored by another American program in Madrid. Topics vary each term.

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402 Stylistics: Cultural Events
This course is designed to advance the student’s written expression through compositions based on a series of cultural (plays, lectures, concerts, etc.) and political events in Madrid.

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430–439 Literature Seminars
Courses in this range of numbers vary from term to term, but may include such topics as Madrid and the Novel, Modern Spanish Poetry, and the Spanish Short Story. These seminars may count toward a Spanish concentration.

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440–449 Seminars in the Social Sciences
Courses in this range of numbers vary from term to term, but may include such topics as Spanish History, Modern Spanish Politics, and Women in Spain. These courses do not count toward a Spanish concentration.

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451 History of Spanish Painting
This course surveys art from the Renaissance to the modern masters. Classes are held in the world-famous Prado Museum.

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Language Placement Regulations

Students wishing to continue a Romance Language studied in high school should register for the appropriate course as explained below. In all matters of placement, the Department makes the final determination, usually on the first day of classes when the language background of all students is checked. Consult the Department if you need further information. Students who have attained considerable fluency from language practice out of the country or at home or some other out-of-school way should consult with the Department Chair for placement. Students wishing to continue a Romance Language in which they have Advance Placement credit or transfer credit from another college must consult the Department Chair for placement. Students who fail to do so and register for a course considered below their level will not receive credit.

French and Italian

Secondary School Placement                      Colgate Placement

No previous study………………………..........101
Level I………………………………………...101
Level II
Fair to good achievement ...…….……..............102 (spring)
Very good to excellent achievement 201
Level III……...………………………….…….201
Level IV
Fair to good achievement or
CEEB below 570………………………….......201
Very good achievement or
CEEB 570-630………………….....………….202
Excellent achievement or
CEEB above 630……………………......…….350
Level V
Fair achievement or CEEB below 570................ 201
Good achievement or CEEB 570-630…............ 202
Very good to excellent achievement or
CEEB above 630……………………….……..350
AP language score of 3……………….....….….202
AP literature score of 3 or 4 ………...................350
AP language score of 4 or 5………….........…...350
AP literature score of 5……………...................301, 350, or 400 w/permission

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Spanish

Secondary School Placement                      Colgate Placement

No previous study………………………….......101
Level 1………………………………………...101
Level II
Fair to good achievement………………............102 (spring)
Very good to excellent achievement.....................201
Level III………………………………………..201
Level IV
Fair to good achievement or
CEEB below 550……………………………....201
Very good achievement or
CEEB 550-620………………………………...202
Excellent achievement or
CEEB above 620…………………………........350 or 361 or 362*
Level V
Fair achievement or CEEB below 550.................201
Good achievement or CEEB 550-620.................202
Very good to excellent achievement or
CEEB above 620……………………………....350 or 361 or 362*
AP language score of 3…………………...........202
AP literature score of 3 or 4……………............350 or 361 or 362*
AP language score of 4…………………...........350 or 361 or 362*
AP literature score of 5…………………...........350, 361, 362, or 400 w/permission*
AP language score of 5…………………...........350

*Students who are unsure as to which of these courses is appropriate for them should consult with a member of the Spanish faculty.

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EXCEPTIONS

1. Students who have finished Level II and need to meet the language requirement are automatically permitted to register for 101 if they consider their prior achievement to be poor.

2. Students who will have had a break in their language study of two years or more or who have an SAT verbal score below 450 may in some instances, with permission of the Department Chair, register for credit courses at a lower level than indicated above.

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